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Posts from the ‘Ichthyosis Support’ Category

“Why is my skin red? ‘Cause blue is taken!” …Teen Panel a Smashing Success at FIRSTNFC!

photo(17)Two open and candid teen panel discussions, moderated by Program Director Moureen Wenik, took place on the final day of the National Family Conference. Nearly every seat full, it took only a minute for parents, siblings, and other affected members to enthusiastically ask questions, jot notes, and ultimately discover that this was as rare and unique an opportunity as any – getting inside the minds of teens! From how to keep their cool when strangers stare, to the pros and cons of parents’ ”picking at their skin,” these teens opened up and let the audience explore their situation, from their eyes; in their shoes; in their skin. Additionally, not only did the panel consist of those teens affected, but also included teen siblings of those affected for an even broader family member perspective on life with ichthyosis.

Some key takeaways from the discussion included:

Silence Isn’t Always a Bad Thing: The teens seemed to agree that sometimes they are “quiet” about their situation because they are coming to terms with it themselves. “We don’t always want to talk about what’s happening every day. Trust that if it’s serious enough, we will come to you,” said one teen girl.

Conf2014-MW (13)-1Listening is Key: Many teens encouraged parents to listen as carefully as possible. One teen remarked, “If you put a cream on me and I say it hurts, please listen to me and don’t force the issue. Even if you’ve heard it works for lots of other people, it may not work for me.”

Follow Our Lead: One teen remarked, “If I don’t want my skin showing, I don’t want it showing. If I want to wear leggings, I should be able to do so.” Ultimately she encouraged parents not to worry, and to follow the emotional lead of their children. “If I’m happy and comfortable with how I look, or what I’m wearing, my parents should be happy too.”

Public Grooming/Dusting: Parents were curious as to how the teens felt about them constantly picking at them or “dusting them off.” Most teens agreed that they were in fact used to it, and that the constant fussing did not greatly upset them. However, they also encouraged parents, that if it was not too much skin, perhaps they could wait until they got home. Another teen remarked that ultimately, “parents should teach kids to check themselves, and make it a lifelong habit.”

Leaving Home: Teens that are preparing to leave for college shared some concerns that they are currently addressing, including air conditioning, securing a private shower, and informing others of their conditions (more on preparing for college). One teen leaving for college this fall remarked, “I worried about what my roommate would think, because I can’t change my skin. But then I explained everything to her, and she said – no big deal. I have ADHD, does that matter to you?!” Another young adult from the audience offered advice based on her own college experience. “Talk to them, be honest and upfront with your roommates. It will also help by letting them know, so that they can support you, in case there is a medical issue – someone around you should know about your condition, particularly if you do not have family close by.”

Overprotective Siblings: From the sibling perspective, it seemed that most of them had more of a difficult time dealing with the skin condition than the affected individuals. A few of them commented that they feel very overly protective of their sibling, and when people make comments or stare, they “lose their cool,” and tend to want to react in an angry and aggressive manner. “I think it’s normal to get upset for your sibling. However resorting to violent comments and behavior is never a good thing. Just try to explain the situation to them, and also, if it’s a younger sibling, you don’t want them to see you getting angry. It’s not a good example,” said one teen sibling.

Transitioning from a Small to Large School, or Starting School in General: The consensus was that having the parents, along with the affected child, go into classroom and inform people about their skin condition was a positive experience. However, one teen strongly suggested, “Make sure that the affected person is prepared to answer the questions themselves, even beyond when the parent is there. Make sure they really know their condition, and how it affects them, so they don’t feel badly for not knowing what to say.”

Speak for Yourself:  For younger children, one teen suggested that maybe it’s not one hundred percent necessary for them to always use the medical terms to discuss their condition. Perhaps if they use their own words to describe their skin, like severely dry, rather than a medical term, it would make the situation more relatable.

Using Your Sixth Sense: Humor – Sometimes turning an uncomfortable question or conversation on its head with a little wit, may be a great way to show peers there is more to you than your skin. One teen commented that whenever he is asked why skin is red, he replies, “’Cause blue was taken!” Although this is not a solution in its entirety, it can really break the ice and lead to a more informative conversation.

We are enormously grateful to our two amazing teen panels for their courage and willingness to share an inside perspective on life as a teen with ichthyosis, and we wish them all the best of luck in all they do!

Not able to make the FIRST National Family Conference? Stay tuned with #FIRSTNFC

 


062212-5436(1)If you are unable to attend the FIRST Family Conference, not to worry. We’ll
be sharing the “Indy 2014″ experience with you, as much as possible, on
Facebook and Twitter throughout the conference. You can look forward to
interviews with attendees and same-day photos of all the families, friends,
and activities!

Be sure and stay in touch with all the excitement by using #FIRSTNFC, the
official conference hashtag! Plus, after the conference we’ll be sharing a
post conference summary, including video clips of presentations along with
news articles, blog posts, and e-mails derived from the very latest
research, treatments and tips for living with ichthyosis, as discussed a2014 Conference Logo-WEBt
the conference.

The FIRST National Family Conference kicks-off on Friday morning, June 20 at 7:00am EDT, and will continue until Sunday, June 22 at 1:30pm. Stay tuned!

 
 

Conference Update: When it comes to Ichthyosis, Do Women Have Different Concerns than Men? Yes.

2014 Conference Logo-WEBAt this year’s National Family Conference in Indiana, Bethanee Schlosser, MD, PhD will  lead a new breakout session, “Unique Considerations for Women with Ichthyosis.” During this session, Dr. Schlosser will identify and address the unmet needs of women with ichthyosis as it relates to their overall skin health, sexual functioning, and quality of life.  This is a unique learning opportunity for women, including a rare chance for women to voice personal experiences and concerns, in a safe and comfortable environment, and to ask those “taboo questions” often left unspoken. The session will include:

  • Effect of ichthyosis on specific functions (breast sensation, lactation, sexual function, etc.) as well as quality of life.
  • Women’s skin health as it relates to vulvar mucosal dermatology.
  • Patient-to-patient resources; group discussion; Q & A …and more!

This is a session for female attendees in any stage life. And, for those of you who may not be able to attend the conference, as with many of the conference breakout sessions, we will provide a recap article, featuring highlights from the session, in our online post-conference summary.

About our Worshope Leader:

Bethanee Schlosser is a Dermatologist and Assistant Professor at Northwestern Medical Faculty Foundation.

Should Grandparents & Extended Family Attend the FIRST National Family Conference?

 

 

At some point in their journey with ichthyosis, individuals and parents with affected children will need assistance, both physically and emotionally, from someone other than their medical practitioner. In difficult times, a reprieve from the day-to-day, a shoulder to lean on, or simply a trustworthy listener, can truly be a life-saver. More often than not, this type of support comes from extended family.  And although it can be stressful, turning to family in these types of situations may not only be therapeutic, but can create unbreakable bonds for parents, grandparents, and siblings.

Perhaps you are the grandparent, aunt, uncle, or sibling of an individual affected with ichthyosis, and are contemplating whether or not to attend the upcoming FIRST National Family Conference?  Over the years we have met countless individuals who were contemplating this very same decision, many of whom ultimately decided it was best to attend the conference, not knowing really what to expect, or if they would gain any benefit at all. Cina,Sean-Portia-Jolie-Mary-Dave2

Mary and David Cina, grandparents of  Myles and Portia Cina, affected with ichthyosis en confetti said, “We attended and will continue to attend FIRST conferences to support our son, daughter-in-law, and grandchildren.  We have learned a lot and enjoyed meeting other families, learning their challenges, and how they have dealt with them.  The doctors provide a wealth of knowledge and are very approachable, willing to help and teach all attendees.” (The Cina Family pictured left)

 

Chrissy See, a sibling of member Rachel See, also affected with en confetti ichthyosis, is not only attending the conference in Indiana this year, but has played a pivotal role in helping to gather items for the conference fundraising raffle. “My family has always been a huge inspiration, and recently my friends, respected colleagues, and even “strangers” have become my new source of inspiration for my involvement with FIRST. In fact sharing on our company community webpage to 200 work friends created generous donations and support. I am looking forward to attending the FIRST National Conference because it will also be a special opportunity for me to learn and grow from others. Awareness is the first step to curing ichthyosis and I am inspired by others to take that next step for my family.” (Chrissy See pictured right).

And Kellie Wilson, sister of Shannon Hamill, and aunt of Lauren Hamill affected with harlequin ichthyosis, has been by her family’s side siKellie Wilson, Shannon Hamill, Kelly Klafternce day one. “ My niece Lauren was born with harlequin ichthyosis. Two words no one in my family had ever heard before. Now the word ichthyosis has become familiar to me and my family and it is not as scary anymore, thanks to the FIRST Family Conferences.  It was comforting knowing that they were not alone and that there was a whole community out there for them to learn from and to share their stories with. The first time in Chicago I was there as more of a supportive role. I wanted my sister and her husband to attend as many discussions as possible without having to worry about Lauren. However, this will be my third conference and I am looking forward to seeing everyone again. ”

 Although there are numerous opportunities for networking and education at the family conference, in the end, it seems that sometimes simply “being there” for a family member may just be the most meaningful kind of support you can give. (Kellie Wilson, Shannon Hamill, Kelly Klafter pictured left).

 

 More Conference Information.

 

 

 

 

Dermatologist Discusses Integrative Approaches to Skin Care, at the National Family Conference.

 

Some of the most popular “eastern” wellness practices have made a permanent impression on the western physical fitness scene, including the practices of Meditation, Yoga, and a nutrient-dense, Plant-Based Diet.

shutterstock_137890049Meditation has been associated with increased focus, and tension relief, while Yoga is widely recognized as a practice for building muscle, increased joint flexibility, and a way to relax the overactive mind.  (Read how one FIRST member, uses Yoga to improve core strength and flexibility, reduce body aches and pains, and lower mental stress).  An exciting, energized and in-depth look at the benefits of these “integrative medicine” practices will be presented at the National Family Conference during the breakout session: Stressed Out? Natural approach for wellness, balance, and healthy living.  This session will be led by Vindhya Lakshmi, Dermatology Resident at Indiana University. Vindhya will discuss how making a few small lifestyle choices, can produce BIG results. Her session will include:

  • Intro to Yoga: How yoga can help reenergize and strengthen your mind, body and spirit
  • Meditation 101: Learn quick and easy breathing techniques to re-center and recharge
  • Fruits, Veggies, and Smoothies OH MY -Yes you can make healthy changes today! 
  • How to Break the Routine and create healthy, long-lasting habits.

 About Our Workshop Leader:
Vindhya is a driven, energetic & proactive Dermatology Resident at Indiana University with a strong and continually expanding passion for overall integrative & holistic wellness. Her future practice will focus around integrative approaches to improve skin care, utilizing both eastern and western techniques. She also advocates a plant-based lifestyle, and is dedicated to empower others to live more fulfilling, proactive lives.

 

 

 

HOW RUDE!

 

National Family Conference Tackles Rudeness Head On

 How Rude, Can You Believe They Said That?”- This breakout session at The National Family Conference will offer all the tips and tactics you’ll need for dealing with unwanted stares, comments, or flat out rude behavior. The session will be led by Eric Scott, a pediatric psychologist from the Riley Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Clinic at Indiana University. Eric has extensive experience working with individuals and their families in adjusting to and coping with chronic medical illness. His work frequently encompasses repairing the effects of bullying and teasing that those with chronic illness face. The session will cover specific ways to respond to instigators; how to emotionally cope with being teased and how to build resiliency in the face of distress and adversity.

 Why Talk About Rudeness?

Over the years countless members have expressed feelings of frustration and isolation, brought about by the emotional roller coaster of dealing with rude comments, bullying, and offensive behavior. And although it is natural to take a defensive posture, and for upsetting emotions to arise, there are also many productive steps that can be taken toward a peaceful resolution. Some of the most widely used practices include:

 Educate Them – Sometimes explaining you or your child’s skin condition is the best way to handle all the questions, stares, and negativity. FIRST can provide you with convenient awareness cards briefly explaining the genetic condition of ichthyosis and that it is not contagious.  These cards can be very useful for public activities, such as dining out or traveling. You can also distribute to someone who has made an offensive or rude comment or simply give to friends, family, or your community.

 Build Your Inner Confidence – Participating in activities that make you, or your child, feel confident and accepted will build resilience toward rudeness. Turning to games, physical activities, hobbies, personal interests – anything you enjoy – is not only enjoyable but can support an emotionally strong outlook in tough situations. Knowing that you have unique skills, strengths, and interests, and sharing those interests with others, will ensure that you are perceived as the multi-dimensional person that you are, and not solely defined by your skin disorder. There will always be people who try and put others down. Self–esteem is the best defense.

 Patience is KeyAs difficult as it may be to accept, sometimes people are just afraid of the unknown. It may take a little while for the whole community to become informed of the disorder, and the special circumstances it may present. Once they have a chance to get to know you or your child – beneath the surface – you will feel more and more comfortable just being yourself, and less concerned with what others may do or say.

We’ll take an even deeper look at this issue during the conference, and provide ample opportunity for members  to ask questions, make suggestions, share stories, and walk away well-equipped for dealing with rude behavior. You will also find our newly expanded Bullying and Rude Behavior Resource Sheet on our website, chock full of ways for you or your child to resolve the uncomfortable situation of “dealing with rude behavior,” as well as suggested reading and links to related resources.

Full Conference Program

 

Living the life you are meant to live…

We are delighted to share a guest post from FIRST member, blogger, portrait photographer and author, Courtney Westlake.

 

Courtney, as many of you know, is the mother of four-year-old Connor, and two-year-old, Brenna Westlake, who is affected with Harlequin ichthyosis. Her blog, Blessed by Brenna, invites readers into the Westlake’s lives and home, taking them along on a weekly journey of medical challenges, extraordinary courage, and the most unexpected life lessons of all. Her posts are a unique blend of topics including personal insight, clinical explanations of ichthyosis, and heartwarming updates on Brenna’s amazing progress.  It is not only a cultural commentary on living with a rare genetic skin disorder but an authentic, inspirational and truly unforgettable journey of love, hope and family.  Her blog this week expresses a moment of  transformation and the deep realization of “accepting the life you were meant to live.” 

 

My survival mode and the loss of the life I had planned

by Courtney Westlake

We are now entering the third year of Brenna’s life, and it seems very surreal to me. Every memory of the years since she arrived are some of my most vivid but yet almost part of a blur too – a blur of emotions, adjustments and just trying to find my way. And relying heavily on God and others.

Even though I’ve been a huge fan of Crystal from Money Saving Mom for a long time, I think I was most looking forward to reading her newly released book because I could relate so much. When I first saw the title, Say Goodbye to Survival Mode, I knew I would be able to both relate to the book and take away so much from it.

Because I was in the trenches of survival mode for a long time. The kind of survival living where life continues around you at lightning speed, but all that you are focused on is whether your child will live. The first year of Brenna’s life, I often felt like I was being smothered. Smothered in grief, frustration, stress. I did my absolute best to focus on the positive.

Courtney Holding Brenna

I said no and stepped away from just about everything I had been involved with. I cut my photography studio work way, way back – after having just completed a beautiful renovation to my studio space the year before. I stepped away from volunteer roles with community organizations. I quit most of my freelance writing jobs.

And instead, I lived one day at a time that year, maybe one week at a time during the better times.

In 2012, there was a NICU stay, eye surgery, 4 additional hospitalizations, surgery for g-tube placement, and multiple skin infections. That was what consumed me that year, and I don’t remember much else. I was surviving, and that was the only option at the time.

I forced myself to get dressed in the morning, to try to find a schedule, to become educated on Brenna’s skin care, to continue to do activities and read with Connor as usual. I forced myself to concentrate on the good instead of the bad. Many times, I forced myself to smile.

(And I accepted help. Because I knew that I needed it. I relied so heavily on everyone in my life for help. Lots of help. We have had so much help I can’t even name it all. And I know without that help, I would likely still be in survival mode. And I just want to take this time to say thank you to all of you for all you did for us during that time. I remember every single act of kindness, every card, every message, every gift card and meal. And I still think about your incredible generosity and thoughtfulness all the time.)

And I would say with complete certainty that every morning I got dressed, every time I focused on what we could do instead of what we couldn’t do, every time I made myself smile instead of cry, it was worth it.cIMG_0145

Because eventually time wore on…and we began to adjust. To life with two children, to life caring for a rare disease. And I realized that I had the chance to take this opportunity to rise up from living in the day-to-day to living both in the present and for the future. I realized that even though you may not be living the life you had planned, that shouldn’t stop you from living the life you were meant to.

Don’t let the loss of the life you had planned stand in the way of the life you were meant to live.

I felt like I was no longer giving things up, like I did that first year, but instead that I was being pulled in new directions, better directions. And I could follow those new paths by choosing the best attitude every day, by choosing to life with intention, by goal-setting again, by using my time wisely.

And I felt like I was almost getting a chance to start over. I could pursue my “best things,” as Crystal calls them in her book – the things I was most passionate about and most set me toward my goals and most fulfilled me.

As Brenna’s health care became less stressful, I did sit down and evaluate exactly what was most important to me and what I wanted to be involved in and what I actually felt like I had time to pursue again. Over the last two years, I’ve stepped back into some of my former roles, and I’ve chosen new ones, like becoming involved in FIRST.

I also have done a lot of praying. I have tried to really open my heart and listen to where God seems to be telling me to invest my time and my energy. To where I should be using my gifts and talents. And how to best care for and provide for my family right now.

CourtneyWestlake-2036In the first year, this blog (referring to blessedbybrenna.com) was very concentrated on one thing, the thing that was the focus of our lives at the time – Brenna. I was even encouraged by a lot of people to share more about other things in our lives, including about myself, but I just couldn’t. There wasn’t much to write about, because my life seemed to revolve around Brenna’s health.

But, gratefully, even though Brenna’s health is obviously a top priority for our family, our lives are now becoming much fuller with other passions and priorities that we have. I am no longer simply surviving, but I am living with intention and purpose again…and much more so than before Brenna’s birth. Though certain times still call for survival mode, I now know how to rise up again from surviving to thriving so that I am not continuing to live in the day-to-day.

And because of this, my writing and my blog have also evolved. I am pursuing more of “my best” and, as you probably have noticed, I am writing more about those things as they all relate to motherhood and the kind of person that I am striving to be…things like my personal goals, freezer cooking (a growing passion of mine and something that saves my sanity!), the books that I’m reading, the books the kids and I are reading, my emotions and feelings as a mother, some of my various writing projects, and my family.

All of these things – not just Brenna alone – influence my life and my role as a mother and wife…and these things are part of the new world of beauty and appreciation for difference that I have discovered because of Brenna’s arrival into our family.
My survival mode was a dark time….a time with a lot of tears and stress and mustering up all the energy that I possibly could just to parent Connor and Brenna every day.

I am proud to say that I now feel like I am living with purpose and intention just about every day. There are many areas I need vast improvement in, and purposeful living is always an exercise in discipline – it is something I work at every day.

But I’ve found that once you get into the habit of smiling, of choosing to see the good over the bad, it comes more easily in all areas of life. And it greatly impacts all other areas of life.

My life today looks much differently than when I envisioned marriage, children and my career as I was growing up. My planned life was much, much different than my real life is. But today, I’m realizing that this is the life that God had planned for me. When I was clinging to the things I felt like I was having to give up, God was leading me toward a different path, a path where I would be able to use the gifts and talents he gave me in a different way, as part of his plan. In each new season, I am striving to open my heart to where I believe God wants me to be and to go.

Now that I have stopped mourning the loss of the life I had planned,

I am discovering every day that the life I am meant to live is so much better.

bookcoverCourtney has recently released her beautiful and inspirational book, That’s How You Know, available at www.blessedbybrenna.com.  Like a warm hug from a very best friend, its uplifting messages and soft illustrations offer hope and inspiration on every page.

 


Building Your Case for Social Security Disability Benefits (SSD)

 

margot 2830.FURYAlthough during his “working years” FIRST member, Steve Flury, had contemplated applying for Social Security Disability (SSD), a nudge from a recent life transition would encourage him to take a serious step toward the process. 

“Once the three kids came along, our budget got really tight, and there was no room for me to miss work because of my condition,” he said.   

His first “real” step toward seeking SSD benefits was actually taken at a FIRST Patient Support Forum, two years ago in Chicago.  “I asked Moureen Wenik (Program Director at FIRST) if I should apply for Social Security Disability benefits and if she thought I’d have a chance,” Steve said.  “Mo’s response was very encouraging. In fact, she said ‘absolutely!’  She gave me some information about the SSD and then…I got to work.”

After consulting with a few Social Security Disability (SSD) attorneys, it was clear that Steve would need to collect all of his medical records including, but not limited to, lab results, photos, biopsies and hospitalization records, from dermatologists, general practitioners, and any other specialists he had ever gone to for medical attention.   Additionally he would need to collect letters from as many doctors as possible, stating that he was in a compromised situation for most work environments. The doctor’s letters would also need to explain the possible health complications associated with lamellar ichthyosis, like overheating and being prone to infections. Plus the letter would need to state that his condition would be long-term, lasting at least one year or longer. 

 “In other words, I was told to go in armed and build as strong a case for myself as possible. So that’s what I did.”

Steve immediately rolled up his sleeves and for the next several weeks, began the journey of contacting all the doctors he had seen for the past twenty years.  His additional due diligence included searching the SSD website for various “disability codes” he would need for his application. “I knew the more prepared I was, the more painless the process,” he mentioned regarding his desire for as “hassle-free” an experience as possible.

 “I have a few other issues like severe eczema, food and environmental allergies and asthma, but I believe the deal sealer was that I had genetic testing done…because you can’t argue with that – and it leaves no room for doubt.”  His genetic testing, showing a positive result for lamellar ichthyosis, added even more credibility to his medical documentation.

“Step one was to submit everything online. Then I was assigned to an agent that I needed to meet with in-person to substantiate the case.”  Due to the detail and thoroughness of his application, Steve was almost immediately approved. “In fact,” he mentioned, “she asked why I hadn’t applied sooner.”  Steve has now been receiving Social Security Disability benefits for nearly a year and a half.

In summary, although there is no  guarantee of approval for any social security disability claim, preparing the application to the best of your ability should include the following:

1) If possible, consult with a SSD attorney to be sure you are following the correct steps, and preparing as thoroughly as possible. Finances should not be a concern because attorneys representing individuals seeking SSD benefits cannot charge for consultations. They are only paid if a person is awarded benefits and the attorney’s fee is approved by either SSA or a Social Security Administrative Law Judge.

2) Contact any doctor, of whom you were once a patient, or currently a patient, and obtain complete medical records, dated as far back as possible.

3) Obtain as many doctor’s letters as possible, outlining specific details about the potential dangerous side effects of the condition of ichthyosis, and that you are in a compromised situation for most work environments. Letters must state that you will have this condition for a least one year or longer.

4) Obtain genetic test results.

Find out more about applying for SSD benefits.  


 


 

“Our Caterpillar Would One Day Be a Butterfly”

We often hear stories from young families who are given the diagnosis of ichthyosis, soon after the birth of their child. Many families are surprised, confused, and often scared. This week we received a story from the Taylor family, sharing not only how they coped with the initial news that their baby Brooklyn, now three months old, was born with lamellar ichthyosis, but how they are finding their strength in Brooklyn herself.
_____________________________________________________________
Brooklyn Taylor was born as a collodion baby in October of 2013 at Fauquier Hospital in IMG_20131107_195144Warrenton, Virginia. We had no knowledge of this beforehand and our oldest child had no signs of ichthyosis, so seeing Brooklyn like that was very scary for us. She was full-term and appeared very healthy, but when they took her from my arms I thought the worst and prepared myself to hear that she wasn’t going to make it. Hours after she was born they transferred her to a more equipped hospital.

She spent nine long days in the NICU ward at University of Virginia in Charlottesville. Doctors came and went and we were told the worst, but we knew that our little caterpillar one day would become a beautiful butterfly. Her skin appeared as if she had been burned and it was so tight that it pulled her mouth and eyes open until they were flipping outwards. We were afraid that she wouldn’t be able to eat on her own due to the complications of her closing her mouth, but Brooklyn didn’t give up. With help from a wonderful lactation specialist she latched on, but later we realized it was less stressful to just bottle feed.

A doctor suggested that we go ahead and do a skin graphic surgery on her eyes to help them close. We begged him to wait until the hard shell came off so we could see if maybe it would fix itself. Weeks after coming home, the membrane fell off and within days Brooklyn was closing her eyes on her own. We went to a follow-up appointment with the doctor and when he saw her he could not believe his eyes.

IMG_20131204_120251 Later that month we were told by her dermatologist that she had lamellar ichthyosis. We were overjoyed to finally have a name to put with the condition, but reading about lamellar was probably the hardest thing for us to do. Of course the pictures and information were very helpful, but they didn’t give us any hope. Later we saw that the hope we were looking for was right there in Brooklyn. From day one, she has showed us to never give up and that she doesn’t need to be healed, but accepted for who she is and how she is – beautiful inside and out.

Three months have passed and we are still learning about her condition and finding out what works for us. Bath time may be long and straining, but Brooklyn seems to enjoy it and she sure does remind us when its time for it. She is a very happy and demanding baby and every day is a challenge, but she loves having all the attention. Other than that, she is a normal child to us and should be treated as one by others. We are so proud of our beautiful little girl and because of her everyone can see what real beauty looks like.


Conference, Connections & Life Changing Moments


There is no greater way to express the life changing moments that occur for members at our Family Conference, than to invite you into one of those very moments. Board member and FIRST advocate Tracie Pretak has had gained enormous benefit from attending the conference, but there is one special moment she’d like to share, that stands out a bit more than the rest.

Not sure if you should attend the conference? Consider this:Twenty-six years ago, I had a two-year old daughter with Lamellar Ichthyosis (LI) and we attended our first FIRST conference and our lives would never be the same. Meeting others who understood, who’d gone through what we were going through, and grew up to be successful and happy was overwhelming!

One man I met, Jim, totally changed my thoughts on how to raise Bailey. You see, Jim, who also has LI, told me that he ran cross-country in high school. That blew my mind…because with LI, Jim can quickly overheat.  He said his parents let him try it and found a safe way for him to do it (people would stand along the route and throw buckets of water on him!). He said they tried to give him as normal a life as possible. And so…I did that with Bailey. And when she wanted to dance, on a hot stage under hot lights, I thought of Jim…and I said yes! We took precautions and trained the dance teacher and stage crew on how to prevent and treat heat stroke.

Bailey not only excelled at dancing, she continues to grace the stage at our annual recital. Plus she now is teaching a new generation of little dancers. I’m not sure any of this would have happened, if we hadn’t met Jim.

Fast forward to last year’s conference. We had not been to one in awhile, but decided to go and encourage other families, kids, and teens affected with ichthyosis. On the first day, we walked into the meeting room and who did we see? Jim! Unbelievable! We hadn’t seen him in 24 years! It was so amazing for Bailey to meet the man that “let her dance!” I felt like everything came full circle in that moment.

We were there to offer to others what he gave to us…HOPE. We learned that Jim has actually run a marathon! What an inspiration! It was so amazing to watch Bailey throughout the conference that weekend. I have never seen her so self-assured, so confident. It was worth every penny spent to see her smile; to see her be so open; to see her inspiring the kids and teens and parents and grandparents!   It was such an amazing weekend of connecting that I don’t think we will ever miss another one.

Come to Indiana…we want to meet YOU!!! – Tracie