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HOW RUDE!

 

National Family Conference Tackles Rudeness Head On

 How Rude, Can You Believe They Said That?”- This breakout session at The National Family Conference will offer all the tips and tactics you’ll need for dealing with unwanted stares, comments, or flat out rude behavior. The session will be led by Eric Scott, a pediatric psychologist from the Riley Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Clinic at Indiana University. Eric has extensive experience working with individuals and their families in adjusting to and coping with chronic medical illness. His work frequently encompasses repairing the effects of bullying and teasing that those with chronic illness face. The session will cover specific ways to respond to instigators; how to emotionally cope with being teased and how to build resiliency in the face of distress and adversity.

 Why Talk About Rudeness?

Over the years countless members have expressed feelings of frustration and isolation, brought about by the emotional roller coaster of dealing with rude comments, bullying, and offensive behavior. And although it is natural to take a defensive posture, and for upsetting emotions to arise, there are also many productive steps that can be taken toward a peaceful resolution. Some of the most widely used practices include:

 Educate Them – Sometimes explaining you or your child’s skin condition is the best way to handle all the questions, stares, and negativity. FIRST can provide you with convenient awareness cards briefly explaining the genetic condition of ichthyosis and that it is not contagious.  These cards can be very useful for public activities, such as dining out or traveling. You can also distribute to someone who has made an offensive or rude comment or simply give to friends, family, or your community.

 Build Your Inner Confidence – Participating in activities that make you, or your child, feel confident and accepted will build resilience toward rudeness. Turning to games, physical activities, hobbies, personal interests – anything you enjoy – is not only enjoyable but can support an emotionally strong outlook in tough situations. Knowing that you have unique skills, strengths, and interests, and sharing those interests with others, will ensure that you are perceived as the multi-dimensional person that you are, and not solely defined by your skin disorder. There will always be people who try and put others down. Self–esteem is the best defense.

 Patience is KeyAs difficult as it may be to accept, sometimes people are just afraid of the unknown. It may take a little while for the whole community to become informed of the disorder, and the special circumstances it may present. Once they have a chance to get to know you or your child – beneath the surface – you will feel more and more comfortable just being yourself, and less concerned with what others may do or say.

We’ll take an even deeper look at this issue during the conference, and provide ample opportunity for members  to ask questions, make suggestions, share stories, and walk away well-equipped for dealing with rude behavior. You will also find our newly expanded Bullying and Rude Behavior Resource Sheet on our website, chock full of ways for you or your child to resolve the uncomfortable situation of “dealing with rude behavior,” as well as suggested reading and links to related resources.

Full Conference Program

 
One Comment Post a comment
  1. Kellie #

    I think this is wonderful! Growing up I was subjected to many stares, comments, etc. , by people of all ages. I found older adults were often more vocal than my peers. From parents of my playmates who were scared for me to play with their kids to school officials that expelled me from school until I obtained a notice from the health department stating that I could attend, there were many opportunities that having this information would have been helpful. I hope parents of and/or children with skin conditions are able to participate. Thanks for offering this presentation!

    Kellie
    Icthyosis Vulgaris

    April 24, 2014

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