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Medical Experts Present Latest News in Ichthyosis Research #FIRSTNFC


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Collaboration was by far the word-of-the-day, with regard to the current culture of the ichthyosis research community.

During the What’s Up with Research session on Saturday morning, Dr. Leonard Milstone began by calling attention to the precise goals of ichthyosis research: understanding the medical and social issues, discovering ways to intervene to improve outcomes, and to effectively disseminate new knowledge. He also mentioned the critical importance of advocacy groups to stay involved, be a non-negotiable step of the process, and to continue to create opportunities for affected families and doctors to connect and learn from each other. With regard to the current state of research, Dr. Milstone said, “Advances in technology have led to more rapid, more informative, and more precise information and discoveries than imagined even 25 years ago.” Yet, Milstone also noted, “This new technology, which is a direct result of investments in research, is expensive.” And with the research expense rising as government support is decreasing, Milstone further emphasized that large-scale collaborations and private foundations will play an increasingly important role in supporting research.

Interview with Dr. Bill Rizzo

Another key focus of the session was the call for worldwide collaboration. Dr. Bill Rizzo introduced the STAIR Consortium, an international multi-center, collaborative research project focusing on genetic diseases that are caused by defects in Sterol (cholesterol) And IsopRenoid metabolism. The STAIR Consortium was created and funded by the NIH and NCATS. Its goal is to establish the natural history of rare diseases, identify biomarkers for future therapy studies, investigate new treatments, discover new diseases, and to train new physicians/researchers to work on rare diseases. Rizzo, one of the world’s leading researchers of Sjögren-Larsson Syndrome explained, “Access to biological data from as many patients as possible is critical for understanding the disease,” and he further emphasized that the input from patient advocacy groups is a necessary part of this type of collaboration. STAIR is currently working with seven patient advocacy groups worldwide, including FIRST.

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(left to right) Drs. Bob Silverman, Keith Choate, Phil Fleckman, Len Milstone

Dr. Choate provided the conference attendees with an update about the promising progress he and his team at Yale have made on the Gene Discovery Project. He mentioned that the Gene Discovery Project began at the FIRST family conference, in one small room, at the 2010 conference in Orlando, Florida. However since then, the research incurred tremendous growth. Including the 57 families recruited here in Indianapolis, they have recruited 375 total families and, so far, they have been able to determine a genetic diagnosis for 247 of those families. Since the Denver conference in 2012, they have also identified three new genes which cause ichthyosis. Choate also noted that advances in genetic sequencing technology has made genetic diagnoses faster and much less expensive. Of the 247 families who were able to obtain a genetic diagnosis from Dr. Choate and his team, 80% of them were able to get that diagnosis through their “pre-screening” process, which looks at the 11 most common genes that cause ichthyosis. This “pre-screening” test now costs the Yale lab between $30 and $50, which is a huge drop in costs from a decade ago. ”Learning more about the specific genetic causes of ichthyosis will enable future research to develop effective therapeutic pathways for treating ichthyosis,” Choate added.

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Dr. Britt Craiglow with patient, Evan Fasciano

Dr. Brittany Craiglow introduced a prospective evaluation of infants and children with congenital ichthyosis, discussing the importance of further investigation into the relationship of the phenotype (the way a disease presents itself) and genotype (the way a disease is caused)of ichthyosis. Craiglow’s evaluation process predicts that mass observation of infants can assist doctors and families in understanding and preparing for issues in growth and development. Specific medical issues observed include electrolyte disturbances, infections, and possible other medical complications, such as loss or obstruction of hearing or eyesight from birth through early childhood. Again, Craiglow also emphasized the need for a collaborative effort between doctors, patients, and patient advocacy groups so that proper management protocols for these medical issues can be established as efficiently and effectively as possible.

Dr. Phil Fleckman spoke about health related quality of life and patient reported outcomes from enrollees in the Ichthyosis Registry. The registry, which collected data directly from patients from 1994-2004, was a collaboration of the MSAB (Medical & Scientific Advisory Board) and was funded by the NIH. In addition to a clinical diagnosis, this type of doctor-patient collaboration has offered doctors critical regarding the “real life” impact of the disease and opening a window into the day to day physical and emotional challenges that often accompany ichthyosis. He hopes to extend these studies to determine how quality of life changes as participants age, to include those enrolled in Keith Choate’s study, and to add newer ways to assess the impact of ichthyosis on those affected and their families.

Judging by the close, supportive and collaborative nature between our doctors, patients, and FIRST, we are poised for great strides in ichthyosis research.

2 Comments Post a comment
  1. Dr. Aloma Lobo #

    Our daughter who we adopted at a month of age
    has Lamellar Ichthyosis. We live in India. I would
    Like to keep in touch with families who attended
    this conference and with researchers.

    July 23, 2014
    • Hello, please feel free to visit our website at http://www.firstskinfoundation.org. It is a great resource for those affected. You can fill out the Contact Us form with any specific requests or information you’d like to receive and someone will get back to you shortly.

      Thank You for your message.
      FIRST

      October 2, 2014

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