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Posts tagged ‘epidermolytic ichthyosis treatment’

Member with self-proclaimed “long legs not meant for running”, will run Aramco Houston Half Marathon for FIRST

 

It is always exciting at FIRST when new members are inspired in such a way that they immediately embrace our community, making the most of our services, resources, and opportunities to connect.  In June of 2013, we met Andrew and Heather Sanders for the first time, along with their son Ruairi, who is affected with epidermolytic ichthyosis (EI), at a regional support meeting in Dallas, Texas.  Ruari was just six months old.  In a little over one year’s time, they have made numerous connections within the FIRST community, providing support for others and enthusiasm for our advocacy efforts, in every possible way.  Today we are sharing the story of why Andrew, a man who self-reportedly does “not have legs for running,” will run 13.1 miles, to say thank you

Heather and I had decided we would try to run a marathon when we moved over to the United States. We had originally applied to do a full marathon in 2012, but our arrival to the states was delayed by a few months, so we decided to defer.  I ran the Houston half marathon in 2013, not long after Ruairi was born.  It was particularly hard to keep my training going on with little to no sleep in the early months!   Obviously, Heather couldn’t run in 2013, because it was only a couple of months after Ruairi was born. She did run her first marathon in 2014 and managed to beat my time! So, needless to say, I have extra motivation for 2015!

Sanders-webBut our story with FIRST began after Ruairi was born in 2012. We were obviously aware of the fact that his skin wasn’t as we’d expected.  It was very red in places, and sort of paper-like in others.  The doctors ran over a number of possible explanations, many of which were deeply concerning, and told us that he would be taken to Texas Children’s Hospital in downtown Houston.  Before he was taken by ambulance, one of the neonatologists mentioned the possibility of ichthyosis to us.

I was aware of ichthyosis, having seen a documentary back home in the UK about a family in England who had two daughters with harlequin ichthyosis.  When we googled the term ichthyosis, the image results primarily showed babies with harlequin, so we knew that Ruairi didn’t have that particular form of ichthyosis. But we were obviously still very worried about him.  Heather quite quickly found her way to both FIRST and the UK ichthyosis support networks and we have found them to be an amazing resource. Indeed Heather is very active in the Facebook community, both with friends whom we’ve met at FIRST conferences and with new members.  We had a great time at the FIRST Family Conference in Indianapolis this past summer. We met some amazing people and learned a great deal.

We were even motivated to organize a fundraiser day at the Houston Astros a few months ago, which we were more than pleased to do.  It’s really great that MLB teams do this for charities.  It brought some of the local families who are affected by ichthyosis together, while raising some awareness among those who came to the table and picked up a wristband or some literature.  Obviously, there is still a long way to go.  It was just only this weekend that I had some harmless but frustrating comments from strangers that Ruairi looked like he’d gotten too much sun.  My stock response is to tell them that he has a skin condition and, and no, I haven’t let my two year old get a second degree burn, although I tend to only think the latter part of that line!

In all honesty, I’m running the 2015 Houston Marathon, January 18, 2015, in hopes that I can raise some money to help 10151801_10152426926206153_735919315687901046_nsupport FIRST by way of thanks for the support they have given us.  I’m sure I can get some of my friends to sponsor me on the basis that a half marathon is a challenge for anybody, but particularly a former basketball player of 6’8″!  My long legs are not really made for running.

In the longer term, I’m sure like most people reading this, I really hope for a cure.  I’m confident that a good amount of research into genetic conditions is already happening and that people who deal with ichthyosis can benefit from scientific discoveries elsewhere.  Obviously this all comes down to money.  Perhaps the money I raise can also be put towards research.  But perhaps just raising a little awareness will also do some good! A donation link has been set up so you can join us in supporting FIRST, and making a difference.

-Andrew Sanders

Your Donations at Work…

 

Latest FIRST funded Research on Regenerative Medicine & Stem Cell Biology

As one might imagine, the most top-of-mind question FIRST is asked by nearly all those affected with ichthyosis is:  What type of research is FIRST currently funding?  And, in fact, one of the most rewarding and exciting parts of our jobs, is…providing the answer.

­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­Since 2006, Dr. Dennis Roop, an internationally recognized leader in skin disease research and his team at the Charles C. Gates Center for Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Biology at the University of Colorado, has been funded by FIRST research grants to continue their cutting-edge work in epidermolytic ichthyosis (formerly known as EHK).

 Traditionally, stem cell research has focused on cells that are isolated from embryos and have unlimited “pluripotentcy” (the potential to differentiate into any type of cell or tissue). However, the goal for Dr. Roop’s  project is to generate induced or “reprogrammed,” pluripotent stem (iPS) cells, from adult cells.

Dr. Roop is specifically working with adult cells of epidermolytic ichthyosis (EI) patients – essentially reprogramming, or “inducing” pluripotentcy, by introducing factors, into these cells, that are capable of removing all of the cell’s memory, stripping it of all genetic coding as an adult cell, and reverting that cell back to an embryonic-like state. The reprogramming procedure gives the adult cells nearly the same pluripotent capabilities as embryonic stem cells.  There are two advantages of working with iPS compared to adult cells: they can multiply for a more prolonged time than adult cells and gene correction strategies work more efficiently in iPS cells than in adult cells.

The long-term goal of Roop’s work is to create iPS cells from individual patients, correct the mutant gene they contain, differentiate the iPS cells into keratinocytes andthen graft the corrected keratinocytes back onto the patient–in hopes that  they will multiply and generate unaffected skin. The research is best described in the above video, taken September 2012, whereby the fascinating research of Dr. Roop and his team is explained to a family affected by EI, in the very clinic the research is being conducted.

What specific progress has been made?

To date, the defective K1 gene in one patient’s iPS cells has been corrected.   This was achieved by introducing a zinc finger nuclease and a piece of DNA that contains the normal version of the mutant K1 gene into the iPS cells.  The zinc finger nucleases are like molecular scissors that cut the K1 gene near the site of the mutation.   The cells own DNA repair machinery then replaces the cut, defective region of the K1 gene with the introduced normal region of the K1 gene.

Tests are currently being performed on the corrected iPS cells to make sure that they are genetically stable and contain no new mutations.  Once that has been confirmed, a special recipe of nutrients will be added to the corrected iPS cells to allow them to become keratinocyte stem cells, and those will then be grafted onto mice to see if they will form a normal epidermis.  Differentiating iPS cells into keratinocytes is routine in many labs and well-established in Roop’s lab.

More on Dr. Dennis Roop’s research regarding EI (epidermolytic ichthyosis).

 


Research on “Gene Therapy Topical Ointment” Continues

Recent groundbreaking siRNA research, led by Northwestern University’s Chair of Dermatology,  Dr. Amy Paller, has inspired new hope for silencing  the underlying mutation of EI (epidermolytic ichthyosis) and its changes to the skin surface.Medical Stock-125943563-web

So what exactly is siRNA?
siRNAs are small interfering RNAs (sometimes called silencing RNAs) that “interrupt” the expression of a specific gene. They can recognize even the tiniest genetic change specifically, and thus can distinguish a normal gene from an abnormal gene. As one might imagine, their discovery has caused a surge in biomedical research and drug development for a variety of diseases.  Now, that surge has crossed paths with EI.

How can siRNA effect EI?
The blistering and thickening of skin seen in EI patients usually results from a change in a single letter of the DNA code (a mutation) that provides the codes for manufacturing keratin protein in the upper layers of skin. This single letter change leads to a protein product (a keratin) which is produced but does not function normally. In a dominant disease, both a normal and an abnormal gene and mRNA exist.  However, siRNAs can identify the abnormal strands of messenger RNA (the intermediary between the mutant gene and the abnormal protein), bind to them, and prevent the altered gene from being translated into protein.  Until now, the problem with siRNA has been getting it through the skin barrier, the outermost layer of the epidermis, and into the cells making the bad protein.

Paller, Amy-2012-WEBEnter:  Dr. Amy Paller, her extraordinary medical research team, and the fascinating field of nanotechnology*.  
Dr. Paller and her team have discovered that siRNA, attached to a “central 13nm gold nanoparticle”  can be rubbed into the skin in a simple topical ointment!  In 2012, her research was rewarded a $75,000 grant, by the 2012 FIRST Research Grant Program.  As of late, “We’ve developed 3-dimensional models of EI skin in culture and have also grafted EI skin to mouse models.  We have found some siRNAs that prevent the gene from being expressed, but are testing them to find the best one that affects the abnormal, but not the normal gene,” said Paller.    Read the full article here.

How will members of FIRST benefit from this research?
This type of non-viral, topically applied gene therapy holds promise for individuals with EI, as well as other dominantly inherited ichthyotic condition.  If such drugs can be delivered by topical applicaoitn, that would be a great advance.  FIRST is committed to providing the latest progress of this research, as well all related news and information.  Please visit our site as frequently as possible for the most recent updates. We also invite you to join our email list at:  www.firstskinfoundation.org.

*Nanotecnology.def: n. a technology executed on the scale of less than 100 nanometers, the goal of which is to control individual atoms and molecules, especially to create computer chips and other microscopic devices.  http://www.scientificamerican.com/topic.cfm?id=nanotechnology