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Posts tagged ‘FIRST’

Bathing Completes the Shedding Process…naturally.

It’s true! Bathing may be even more important to the shedding process, than previously considered, as it does not only cleanse our skin of dirt and other external debris, it completes the natural process of desquamation, sweeping away spent and finished epidermal cells.

What exactly is desquamation?
The epidermis is a self-renewing system. Old cells (or ‘squames’) are shed from the skin surface as new cells (‘keratinocytes’) are produced, in the underlying epidermis, and pushed outward into the stratum corneum (the outer most layer of the epidermis) to become ‘corneocytes’. This process is known as desquamation.

In the recent past, it was thought that the process of desquamation initiated the progressive breakdown (‘proteolysis’) of proteins forming structures, called ‘corneodesmosomes’. These protein forming structures link adjacent ‘corneocytes’ to one another.  We know know this prior model does not fully account for desquamation, because the cells detach well above the sites where these junctions are degraded. In other words, proteolysis of corneodesmosomes may be necessary for desquamation, but it is not sufficient to complete the entire shedding process.

Instead, recent studies show that cells detach following hydration.  Water swells the extracellular spaces and separates adjacent corneocytes. As the water evaporates from between corneocytes, it is replaced by air, which eventually allows individual cells to detach from the skin surface.

What does this mean for the ichthyosis community?
There’s no question – for those affected by ichthyosis, frequent bathing is now even more important, as it is not only the best way, but the most natural way to remove dry scales and skin – and, most importantly, more frequent bathing can ease the distress of ichthyosis, making day to day life much more comfortable.

Resource: Peter M. Elias, MD. http://eliasandwilliams.com/what-allows-skin-to-shed/

For more information on the permeability barrier, the most critical, life-enabling function of skin, visit the FIRST page on the  Inside Out of Skin a groundbreaking website developed by Peter M. Elias, MD, and Mary L. Williams, MD.

 

Research on “Gene Therapy Topical Ointment” Continues

Recent groundbreaking siRNA research, led by Northwestern University’s Chair of Dermatology,  Dr. Amy Paller, has inspired new hope for silencing  the underlying mutation of EI (epidermolytic ichthyosis) and its changes to the skin surface.Medical Stock-125943563-web

So what exactly is siRNA?
siRNAs are small interfering RNAs (sometimes called silencing RNAs) that “interrupt” the expression of a specific gene. They can recognize even the tiniest genetic change specifically, and thus can distinguish a normal gene from an abnormal gene. As one might imagine, their discovery has caused a surge in biomedical research and drug development for a variety of diseases.  Now, that surge has crossed paths with EI.

How can siRNA effect EI?
The blistering and thickening of skin seen in EI patients usually results from a change in a single letter of the DNA code (a mutation) that provides the codes for manufacturing keratin protein in the upper layers of skin. This single letter change leads to a protein product (a keratin) which is produced but does not function normally. In a dominant disease, both a normal and an abnormal gene and mRNA exist.  However, siRNAs can identify the abnormal strands of messenger RNA (the intermediary between the mutant gene and the abnormal protein), bind to them, and prevent the altered gene from being translated into protein.  Until now, the problem with siRNA has been getting it through the skin barrier, the outermost layer of the epidermis, and into the cells making the bad protein.

Paller, Amy-2012-WEBEnter:  Dr. Amy Paller, her extraordinary medical research team, and the fascinating field of nanotechnology*.  
Dr. Paller and her team have discovered that siRNA, attached to a “central 13nm gold nanoparticle”  can be rubbed into the skin in a simple topical ointment!  In 2012, her research was rewarded a $75,000 grant, by the 2012 FIRST Research Grant Program.  As of late, “We’ve developed 3-dimensional models of EI skin in culture and have also grafted EI skin to mouse models.  We have found some siRNAs that prevent the gene from being expressed, but are testing them to find the best one that affects the abnormal, but not the normal gene,” said Paller.    Read the full article here.

How will members of FIRST benefit from this research?
This type of non-viral, topically applied gene therapy holds promise for individuals with EI, as well as other dominantly inherited ichthyotic condition.  If such drugs can be delivered by topical applicaoitn, that would be a great advance.  FIRST is committed to providing the latest progress of this research, as well all related news and information.  Please visit our site as frequently as possible for the most recent updates. We also invite you to join our email list at:  www.firstskinfoundation.org.

*Nanotecnology.def: n. a technology executed on the scale of less than 100 nanometers, the goal of which is to control individual atoms and molecules, especially to create computer chips and other microscopic devices.  http://www.scientificamerican.com/topic.cfm?id=nanotechnology 

Raising Awareness for Rare Disease… One Cape at a Time

 

If you search the Internet for the origin of the “superhero cape,” as I just did, you might find yourself lost in a cyber-sea of Superman quotes, Twilight-tween tweets, and an oddly expansive selection of Zorro fan pages and Batman vs. Green Lantern public debates. I suppose now I am well equipped with unique and witty cocktail party conversation – particularly on Halloween – but more importantly, I am also certain that the superhero cape, regardless of its origin – has grown into a universally iconic symbol, summed up in single word: adventure.

For Robyn Rosenberger, founder of “Tiny Superheroes”, life, lately, has been nothing less. I had the great pleasure of speaking with this unlikely seamstress, who is quickly becoming an icon in her own right.

“I am not a seamstress by any stretch,” Robyn said when describing her epiphanic moment. “During the summer of 2012, I made three capes. One for my son, my nephew and my dog – just out of the blue, just for fun, and they loved it.”  That same summer she had also been following the blog, Blessed by Brenna – a weekly chronicle, authored by a young mother who happened to be an old schoolmate of Robyn’s husband – and who had also just given birth to a baby affected with Harlequin ichthyosis.

Then, one day while perusing the Blessed by Brenna blog, it happened — the “Aha” moment that would change Robyn’s life….

“Brenna needs a superhero cape because she is truly extraordinary!” Robyn thought as she rolled up her sleeves and began to assemble the fourth little cape she had ever sewn in her life.

However, when the story of Brenna’s cape broke in the blogosphere on both Robyn and Brenna’s blogs, it was as if the whole world was watching.  Unbeknownst to Robyn, when she had sewn that last little stitch on Brenna’s little cape, she had also begun the thread of something truly extraordinary herself – an organization that would empower children affected by rare disease all over the world.

“We decided to set up a page on our blog where we could take nominations for the next Tiny Superhero to receive a cape.” Her blog, Tiny Superheroes, now receives nearly 20 nominees a day, from a vast range of rare genetic disease communities, the world over.

“We seem to have a lot of interest from the ichthyosis community. It has been so wonderful getting to know these kids. And what’s been really amazing is that the children are all so different, so special in their own way.”

Tiny Superheroes has  been featured on Today.com, Fox News, Evening Magazine and the Huffington Post. But the most surprising fact?  The entire organization officially opened its doors just four months ago, in January of 2013.  “Now we’re even getting messages from people all over the world who’d like to volunteer and help us sew capes.  I’m trying to figure it all out as it comes – it’s really incredible how quickly it’s grown – but it seems to be all working so far.”

The second most surprising fact? In those mere four months, Robyn, and a small army of volunteers, have sewn nearly 500 capes – (although Robyn alone sewed 300 of them!)

Admittedly, this was not a lifelong dream of Robyn’s, as she had no experience, nor grandiose vision of one day helping to raise awareness for rare diseases. “It’s like the kids chose me, and it’s taken on a life of its own. I feel so privileged and I couldn’t be happier about where everything is going.”

By all accounts, the kids chose well.

However, Robyn now knows that she may not have been chosen to simply sew hundreds and hundreds of tiny capes.  “What I realized is that this work can help kids raise awareness for their own disease – which is really powerful. It’s much more than giving them a cape. It’s letting these kids know they can change the world. And I believe they can.”

And there you have it – no searching, nor super power, necessary.  Sometimes a hero really does just…come along.

For more on volunteering, donating, or nominating a Tiny Superhero go to www.Tinysuperheroes.com.

Learn more about how Robyn is empowering Tiny Superheroes on the video below.

Tiny Superheroes Video Screenshot-2013

 

Woman with Harlequin Ichthyosis Delivers a Healthy Baby Boy

 

 

First known case of a woman affected with
Harlequin Ichthyosis Giving Birth

 

Turner,Stephanie-Will 5-26-2013-web-WMCOLMAR, PA (May 28, 2013) In Little Rock, Arkansas, 20-year-old Stephanie Turner, of Wynne, Arkansas, gave birth to William Curtis Drake Turner at Little Rock Hospital on May 25, 2013.  Little Will, as his parents will call him, weighed 7 pounds, 10 ounces and mother and son are said to be resting comfortably.

Stephanie, who is affected with the very rare skin disorder Harlequin ichthyosis, was not sure if she would be able to carry a child.  She and her husband Curt were thrilled last October when they realized they were expecting.  Stephanie was treated at a high-risk OB/GYN and her pregnancy was relatively normal.

Stephanie is a member of the Foundation for Ichthyosis & Related Skin Types, Inc.® (FIRST).  Founded in 1981, FIRST is the only foundation in the United States dedicated to helping those affected with all forms of ichthyosis.

There is no known cure for ichthyosis, only treatments,” said Jean Pickford, Executive Director of FIRST.  “This is a very exciting time in the ichthyosis community.  It offers hope that those affected with Harlequin ichthyosis can certainly lead happy and fulfilling lives.”

According to FIRST, each year, more than 16,000 babies are born with some form of ichthyosis, of those, approximately 300 are born with a moderate to severe form.  This disease affects people of all ages, races, and gender. The disease usually presents at birth, or within the first year, and continues to affect the patient throughout their lifetime.

Turner-Will-5-2013-WMAbout the Foundation for Ichthyosis & Related Skin Types, Inc.®
The Foundation for Ichthyosis & Related Skin Types, Inc.® (FIRST) is the only nonprofit foundation in the United States dedicated to families affected by the rare skin disorder ichthyosis.  Approximately 300 babies each year are born with a moderate to severe form of ichthyosis.  FIRST educates, inspires, and connects those touched by ichthyosis and related disorders through emotional support, information, advocacy, and has supported more than $1.4 million in research funding for better treatments and eventual cures.  For more information, call toll-free at 1.800.545.3286 or visit www.firstskinfoundation.org.

 

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