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Posts tagged ‘Topical Ointment’

We Asked. You Answered!

Recently we posted a question on Facebook regarding the best solutions for putting lotion on an infant or toddler with ichthyosis, (so it doesn’t feel  like a wrestling match!) The answers were so remarkably unique, we not only wanted to say thank you for your creativity, but we also wanted to share these helpful tips with the entire FIRST family – particularly those caring for a child with ichthyosis…

  • DVD player and an Elmo movie
  • IPad and we watch music videos on YouTube
  • I sang songs to my daughter. When she got older, we played name that tune. She is in 6th grade now and still asks to play name that tune when she is soaking in the tub.
  • Sing to them! Or let them run around while you chase them and apply their lotion… This gives you both a good workout.
  • Center yourself with deep breaths before and during applications. Be aware of your facial expressions and tone of voice and seek to impart calmness and empathy. If humor is at your finger tips, giggle with your child as she or he squirms. Use a soothing lullaby or music to accompany you. Give your toddler a plastic doll and lotion so they can play at being the one in charge. Give lots of time for open ended play.
  • Let them “help” with a little coconut oil so if it goes in their mouth it’s safe.
  • Try to turn it into a fun game.
  • Make up creaming songs with all the body parts.
    “This is how we cream our tummy….”
  • Give them a toy to hold. Sing a song. Tickle in between rubbing.
  • My husband and I make it a game and have our 23 month old help us out. She’s gotten to the point where she will tell us where to put it on next.
  • If they aren’t light sleepers, while they slumber. Otherwise you need 2 people, one to hold them still, the other to apply. Singing was always a way to improve an arduous task.

Any more tips for “lotion time?”  Contact: Mneville@firstskinfoundation.org

Research on “Gene Therapy Topical Ointment” Continues

Recent groundbreaking siRNA research, led by Northwestern University’s Chair of Dermatology,  Dr. Amy Paller, has inspired new hope for silencing  the underlying mutation of EI (epidermolytic ichthyosis) and its changes to the skin surface.Medical Stock-125943563-web

So what exactly is siRNA?
siRNAs are small interfering RNAs (sometimes called silencing RNAs) that “interrupt” the expression of a specific gene. They can recognize even the tiniest genetic change specifically, and thus can distinguish a normal gene from an abnormal gene. As one might imagine, their discovery has caused a surge in biomedical research and drug development for a variety of diseases.  Now, that surge has crossed paths with EI.

How can siRNA effect EI?
The blistering and thickening of skin seen in EI patients usually results from a change in a single letter of the DNA code (a mutation) that provides the codes for manufacturing keratin protein in the upper layers of skin. This single letter change leads to a protein product (a keratin) which is produced but does not function normally. In a dominant disease, both a normal and an abnormal gene and mRNA exist.  However, siRNAs can identify the abnormal strands of messenger RNA (the intermediary between the mutant gene and the abnormal protein), bind to them, and prevent the altered gene from being translated into protein.  Until now, the problem with siRNA has been getting it through the skin barrier, the outermost layer of the epidermis, and into the cells making the bad protein.

Paller, Amy-2012-WEBEnter:  Dr. Amy Paller, her extraordinary medical research team, and the fascinating field of nanotechnology*.  
Dr. Paller and her team have discovered that siRNA, attached to a “central 13nm gold nanoparticle”  can be rubbed into the skin in a simple topical ointment!  In 2012, her research was rewarded a $75,000 grant, by the 2012 FIRST Research Grant Program.  As of late, “We’ve developed 3-dimensional models of EI skin in culture and have also grafted EI skin to mouse models.  We have found some siRNAs that prevent the gene from being expressed, but are testing them to find the best one that affects the abnormal, but not the normal gene,” said Paller.    Read the full article here.

How will members of FIRST benefit from this research?
This type of non-viral, topically applied gene therapy holds promise for individuals with EI, as well as other dominantly inherited ichthyotic condition.  If such drugs can be delivered by topical applicaoitn, that would be a great advance.  FIRST is committed to providing the latest progress of this research, as well all related news and information.  Please visit our site as frequently as possible for the most recent updates. We also invite you to join our email list at:  www.firstskinfoundation.org.

*Nanotecnology.def: n. a technology executed on the scale of less than 100 nanometers, the goal of which is to control individual atoms and molecules, especially to create computer chips and other microscopic devices.  http://www.scientificamerican.com/topic.cfm?id=nanotechnology